How The Stage Holds The Secret To Success

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How The Stage Holds The Secret To Success

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It was once said that the secret to good acting is not acting at all.

On the stage, even at the youngest of age, people learn how to perform. They learn how to enunciate. They learn how to express themselves. They learn how to capture and hold the attention of others. They learn how to inspire feelings within their audience and they learn how to be confident in front of others.

So whilst people can be misguided into believing that the stage is a haven for little more than dreamy, effervescent or attention seeking people, the truth is that the stage brings with it far, far more value than that. Within the stage are the building blocks for a fulfilled, happy life– both personally and professionally.

I first performed on stage at the age of 6, as part of a choir. A soft break-in, being exposed in front of parents and family with other children, as opposed to being alone, and yet the unique advantage of performing in that way is apparent even from my memories of that night.

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Accepting Performance

[/fusion_title][fusion_text]Here’s the thing: every human being on this earth performs and they do it every day. When you’re walking down the street and you see a parent walking past, hand-in-hand with their small child, you’re not seeing this person as themselves, you’re seeing them in the role of parent to their son or daughter.

When you go into the butchers, it’s very easy to think Big Kev behind the counter is just Big Kev but he isn’t. He’s Big Kev… the butcher. Even with your lover, you’re never ever out of role. Whether it’s seducer, rewarder, requester or behester, there’s always a role for us to play in every interaction with another human being and we all do this every time, every day, our entire lives.

And here’s why this is a vital fact to acknowledge:
The people who are happy, no matter what shape, size, social class, gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation are the ones who accept and adapt to their roles the best. The single mum who is proud to be so. The homosexual who shouts it loud and proud. The man with a boy inside who never grew up and who he never wants to grow up.

The secret to happiness is in how we embrace the roles we sign up to play, often for life. The girl with twenty tattoos that she gets because she loves the art and the expression can either embrace the role of the edgy, alternative girl no longer the image of traditional, pure-bred femininity and be happy or she can remain at odds with her role, perform it badly and then suffer the frustration when she remains in limbo between scenes.[/fusion_text][fusion_title hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default”]

Learning To Perform Means Learning To Live

[/fusion_title][fusion_text]On stage children in particular learn how to channel themselves into different roles. These skills in performance prove to be vital in their adult lives. For the naturally timid boy, understanding how to channel confidence in an important business meeting could prove to be the difference between success and failure.

For the naturally brash and aggressive girl, learning how to channel humility could prove to be the difference between attracting the man of her dreams and pushing him away.

For the future parents in us all, learning how to exist in the role of the caring nurturer, capable of suffering pain when we discipline our child if he or she needed it, could prove to be the difference between that child living a happy childhood and living a sad one.
Most importantly, on stage, children learn how to mould themselves to suit whichever role is demanded of them at the time. This is crucial. In their future life, once the discovery period of puberty has passed, adolescents will be faced with a question of identity which will go on to define their entire lives.

Once that question is answered, whether then or years later, and each and every one of us find ourselves stepping into the personal roles we want to be (the artist, the scholar, the athlete, etc.) complete with the mentality that comes with it, our ability to adapt and live within that role will distinguish those who are happy in life and those who aren’t.[/fusion_text][fusion_title hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default”]

The Reason We Do It

[/fusion_title][fusion_text]This is the reason why we build stages. It’s not for some indescribable love of carving square wood blocks, or moulding steel frames. We do it to give people a chance. To hold events. To recognise greatness. To achieve dreams. To find hidden talent. And yes indeed to find themselves.

So I bequest you to consider, when you’re next judging the stage in the narrow light of insecurities or people wanting to be seen and heard too much, take a moment and think about the happiest person you know and how snug she is in her own skin. In his own role.

This is a person who doesn’t need to act because they’ve learnt to adapt. By performing and learning how to perform. That’s the thing you learn on a stage.[/fusion_text][fusion_separator style_type=”none” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” alignment=”center” /][fusion_text]

The stage makes a happy person. This is why we make the stage.

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