Unistage exam buster: GCSE revision skills

While for some the summer school term may be all about winding down and looking forward to the upcoming holidays, for many students it’s all about exams.

The pressure of exams and the revision required can take its toll on students with evenings, weekends, and holidays filled with memorising fact upon fact – but revision needn’t be that hard.

By keeping calm, focused and employing the right kind of revision techniques passing those all-important exams can be a breeze.

Find the right revision technique for you

Reading through notes for hours upon end can be frustrating, especially when you fail to remember anything at the end of a day-long revision session.

If you’ve found this is the case for you, it may be that solitary study just isn’t for you.

There are seven key learning styles and you need to identify which type is best suited to you.

From reading the descriptions below you may be able to work out what type of learner you are, if not you can determine your learning style in this simple quiz.

The visual (spatial) learner

Mind map

Prefers using pictures, images and spatial understanding

Should use mind maps, models, timelines and colour coded notes

You could also display key facts and notes on index cards, displayed on your wall or on a pin board

The aural (auditory musical) learner

Headphones

Prefers using sound and music to help them learn

Should discuss topics with friends or family, set information to rhyme, rhythm or music and consider joining a study group

Background music may also aid learning

The verbal (linguistic) learner

Writing

Prefers using words both in speech and writing

Should consider reading out aloud while revising or using recordings of content. Acronym mnemonics will also be useful for remembering key lists of information

Role-play may be useful to try alongside others with the same learning style

The physical (kinaesthetic) learner

hands

Prefers using their body, hands and sense of touch

Should learn through doing, rewriting important information and redrawing key charts

On-site visits (for example on a historical or geographical topic) may help a physical learner retain information better

The social (interpersonal) learner

Group revision

Prefers to learn in groups or with other people

It may be worth joining a revision group or actively taking part in revision classes. You may also find you learn things more easily if you have to explain a concept to someone else

The logical (mathematical) learner

logic 2

Prefers using logic, reasoning and systems

Understanding the detail behind the compulsory content will help the logical learner. Statistics and other analytical techniques may also help you identify areas you want to concentrate on

Be aware of overanalysing as this can prevent you from moving towards your goal. Spending lots of time planning how to go about doing your revision isn’t going to help you pass the exam!

The solitary (intrapersonal) learner

Solitary learning

Prefers to work alone and use self study

Logs and journals can be a useful way to record your notes and find out what kind of study works best for you

It may be worth challenging yourself with a bit of role-play. You don’t need others to role-play with, just use visualisation!

To learn about the ways we can help your school, visit our education page. Our versatile, multi-level staging can be used for a wide range of purposes – from end of year award ceremonies, to everyday assemblies and summer school concerts. You can also speak to one of our experts today by calling 01254 680 575 to find out just what out staging solutions can do for you.

Do you have any tips for keeping your cool during the exam period? If so, share your revision and exam tips and advice in the comments below or tweet us @Unistage